Why Lawyers should Audit Their Life

So I’ve talked about drift recently, and for the moment I’m going to leave that where it is.

Today I’m going to address one of the things that I think is a huge cause of the drift, and of the erosion that we experience in our lives.

It’s one of the things that I think is a big contributor to how we end up in these situations but we actually don’t quite realize how we got there in the first place.

And what is that? It is the accumulation of stuff.

If you want to address the drift that I’ve spoken about before, it’s time to audit your life.

See how in this video:

So I’ve talked about drift recently, and for the moment I’m going to leave that where it is.

Today I’m going to address one of the things that I think is a huge cause of the drift, and of the erosion that we experience in our lives.

It’s one of the things that I think is a big contributor to how we end up in these situations but we actually don’t quite realize how we got there in the first place.

And what is that? It is the accumulation of stuff.

Now I’m not necessarily talking about material things. I’m talking about everything.

I’m talking about the accumulation of:

  • tasks;
  • material things;
  • responsibilities;
  • friends who may not be that good of friends;
  • extra work that we didn’t think we really had to take on in the first place, but we couldn’t say no to.

And I want to encourage you to address that today by taking an audit of all of the things that you do. Go through your life, personal and professional.

Take all aspects into account, and list out everything you do, everything you’re responsible for, every person you have to see, every task you must do, every job you must attend to, and have a look through that list and think: how many of these things did I deliberately and consciously say yes to for some sort of good reason?

How many of these things are in fact leftover from decisions that I made previously that I no longer would have made?

Perhaps they are things that you were asked to do that you weren’t brave enough to say no to at the time, and things that perhaps are no longer that relevant to you in the direction you want to be heading in in your life.

Taking that audit is a powerful, powerful tool, and I really want to encourage you to do it. Audit your life.

It sounds like a big task, but it’s actually not as massive as you might think at the outset. Take a look through the clutter in your life. Have a look what’s bothering you at night time, what’s keeping you up, what’s keeping you from being occupied with the things you want to be occupied with, and the things that you consider just to be a burden or responsibility.

And, of course, then we’re going to take a look some time later at actually getting rid of those things and filtering out that chaff that you identify as part of this audit process.

But for the moment just sit back, and do the audit. If you want, I have a downloadable spreadsheet. You’re welcome to download that and use that as a base starting point for getting going.

So take the audit, list out everything that you do, and we’re going to have a look at addressing those things to start minimizing the clutter, and really starting to tackle the drift and the erosion that’s occurring in your personal and professional lives.

That’s it for this one.

Happy lawyering!

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