Stop Producing Boring Content!

For the love of everything, could we please (you know – as a profession) stop producing content that sends people to sleep.

I know – we are experts in fields that are confusing and difficult, so we try to write articles explaining cases, new pieces of legislation and other things that are inherently pretty hard to write about in an interesting way.

And yet – we don’t actually try.

Today is all about lawyers and fixing up our approach to articles, but if you really want to take it seriously you need to head over to A Modern Professional to get your personal platform and content marketing strategy information.

Does it All have to be Articles?

As a writer of articles, I think that articles are great – within reason.

But, with rare exceptions, that’s all we seem to produce.

Articles, more articles, and then articles which summarise our other articles.  Then we do an article about our articles to try and get people to subscribe to our articles.

There are so many options now and, quite frankly, it’s an indictment on our profession that we are so boring and slow that most of us over the last 5 years haven’t been finding ways to do:

  1. Effective Infographics
  2. Podcasts (yes – I have a podcast)
  3. Videos (OK – so sometimes people have tried this and it hasn’t gone so well)
  4. Phone Apps
  5. Live streaming
  6. Webinars with actual interaction

Don’t just do articles – it’s ultra boring.

With all of the resources, time and staff that law firms have available, I’m frankly amazed how little we explore these possibilities.

Stuff about how Clever and up to date We Are

Somewhere along the way we forgot that content isn’t actually for us.

Yet, without much effort at all, we produce articles that are mostly only interesting to other lawyers.

Case studies summarising what a case is about, rather than telling people why they need to care.

Legislation updates telling people that things passed through the senate on X date (as if they care).

Press releases about how our great firm was recognised in such a such a way (#humblebrag anyone?).

How does any of this help people?

It doesn’t.

Are a general rule (and I look forward to all the emails with reasons why I’m wrong here), none of the following help anyone do anything or improve their lives in any way:

  1. Case citations
  2. Section numbers
  3. Full citations
  4. What the judge below said
  5. Who said what in the second reading speech or the debate about the legislation
  6. All the facts (seriously – a page of facts when only 1 sentence was relevant – WHY!?!?)

Here’s a trick – you know, using the internet ‘n’ stuff – hyperlink to the legislation or the case for those hard core fans who actually care about that stuff.  Just don’t use up valuable column inches.

Content should Help People

This article, in case you’ve not noticed, is about how you can produce better, more meaningful, and more engaging content for your audience.

Likewise, things you produce should actually help people.

It should warn them of problems they don’t know about, or tell them how to solve problems they do know about.

If should offer them opportunities to do more, make more, or experience more.

If should be relevant to them.

Go now – and write, record, produce, engage – to help people.

Happy Lawyering!

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